Quick Answer: How To Say What’S Up In French?

How do you say hey what’s up in French?

Use the French slang quoi de neuf carefully. This French phrase translates into “what’s up?” and can be used as an informal greeting. As you might suspect from its English equivalent, quoi de neuf is slang and should also be reserved for friends and family.

How do you answer what’s up in French?

Answer and Explanation: but is still frequently used to mean, ‘ What’s up?’ Quoi de neuf? is pronounced, ‘kwa duh nuhf. ‘ Another possible expression is Ça va?, although this is more commonly translated as ‘How’s it going?’

How do you formally say what’s up?

Different Ways to Say “What’s Up?”

  1. Sup? ( short slang version of what’s up)
  2. Howdy?
  3. How’s it going?
  4. What’s going on?
  5. Wagwan (Slang version of ‘What’s going on? ‘)
  6. What’s happening?
  7. What’s new?
  8. Anything new with you?

How do you say cool in French slang?

Frais/fraîche This is used exactly the same was as it is in English. Literally, frais means ‘fresh’ and will be used to describe food, but the younger generation also uses it to describe things that they deem ‘cool’.

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How do you reply to Bonjour?

So to say “hello, how are you?” in French, simply say bonjour, ça va? or salut, ça va? If someone says this to you, you can respond with ça va bien (“it’s going well”) or tout va bien (“everything’s going well”). In Quebec, you’ll often hear “not bad” as the response: pas pire, which literally means “no worse”.

What is the reply of whats up?

4 Answers. “What’s up” means “What’s happening.” I usually just reply ” nothing.” because nothing is happening to me. But, there are alternatives, such as the usual reply to a greeting: Not much.

Is whats going on a greeting?

It is an informal way of greeting. Usually among friends to find out what’s happening. As in “How’s it going? Or What’s up?” It is sometimes used as an expression of concern and awaiting an explanation about a situation.

What’s your name in French?

If you’d like to say “What is your name?” in French, you generally have two options. To pose the question formally, you’d say “ Comment vous-appelez vous? Speaking informally, you can simply ask “Comment t’appelles-tu?”

What can I say instead of I am fine?

10 expressions to Use In Speaking And Writing:

  • I’m fine thank you.
  • I feel great / marvellous / fine.
  • Couldn’t be better.
  • Fit as a fiddle.
  • Very well, thanks.
  • Okay.
  • Alright.
  • Not bad.

When a guy says what’s up to a girl?

It’s just a greeting meaning ” What is happening?”, and a reply that nothing’s happening means you’re fine. That is an expression that has about as much meaningfulness as “How are you?” or “How’s it going?” All, including “What’s up?” are used as greetings.

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What can I ask instead of how are you?

What To Ask Instead Of ‘How Are You? ‘

  • How are you today?
  • How are you holding up?
  • I’ve been thinking about you lately. How are you doing?
  • What’s been on your mind recently?
  • Is there any type of support you need right now?
  • Are you anxious about anything? Are you feeling down at all?

Is Sacre bleu a swear word?

Sacrebleu or sacre bleu is a French profanity used as a cry of surprise or happiness. It is a minced oath form of the profane sacré dieu, “holy God”. The holy God exclamation being profane is related to the second commandment: “Thou shalt not take the name of the Lord thy God in vain.”

Why do the French say sacre bleu?

Bleu, meaning “blue” in French, rhymes with Dieu, making it a handy way to avoid blasphemy. Sacré in French means “sacred,” so taken together sacrebleu, literally means “Holy blue!” instead of sacré Dieu (“Holy God!”)

What does Bobo mean in French?

PARIS— The French have embraced a new expression to describe those who have it all: Bobo. The term is short for bourgeois and bohemian, two social castes no one ever expected to find mixed up together. Bobo takes over where the old Mitterrand-era label “gauche caviar,” or caviar socialist, left off.

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