Quick Answer: How To Say Good Job In Japanese?

How do you praise in Japanese?

How to compliment in Japanese

  1. 素敵 [Suteki] – Fantastic! Beautiful!
  2. かっこいい [Kakkoii] – Cool!
  3. かわいい [Kawaii] – Cute!
  4. すばらしい [Subarashii] – Wonderful!
  5. 上手 [Jouzu] – You’re good at this!
  6. 優しい [Yasashii] – You’re so kind!
  7. 頑張っているね [Ganbatteirune] – You sure are working hard!
  8. 美味しい [Oishii] – Yummy!

How do you say good job politely?

For a job well done

  1. Perfect!
  2. Thanks, this is exactly what I was looking for.
  3. Wonderful, this is more than I expected.
  4. This is so great I don’t need to make any revisions to it at all.
  5. I appreciate your critical thinking around this project.
  6. Well done—and ahead of deadline too!
  7. You are such a team player.

What can I say instead of good job?

50 Alternatives to “Good Job”:

  • You worked hard on that project.
  • You put a lot of detail into your picture.
  • That took a lot of patience.
  • Your studying really paid off.
  • That shows dedication.
  • You are really getting good at printing your name.
  • You colored the sky blue and the house purple (describe what you see)
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How do you say awesome job?

Good work! That’s the best ever. Superb! Exactly right!

What is Sugoi in Japanese?

すごい (Sugoi) is a word that’s typically used when you’re left awestruck out of excitement or feel overwhelmed. This can be for any situation be it good or bad. A similar English expression would go somewhere along the lines of “Oh… Wow”. However, it can also be used to express that something is terrible or dreadful.

What is Yokatta in Japanese?

It was good. / I’m glad. YOKATTA is the past form of an adjective, II (good). It is an expression used in a casual conversation between friends. So, the polite way of ending a sentence, DESU, is omitted.

Can I say good job to my boss?

A simple well done or nice one is much more acceptable and can be used between people of any position. In the USA, the phrase good job is used much more often and has no negative connotations that I know of.

What can I say instead of good luck?

You can say:

  • Wish you all the best!
  • Wish you the best of luck!
  • Good luck with that!
  • Best of luck!
  • I wish you luck!
  • Wishing you lots of luck!
  • Fingers crossed!
  • Break a leg!

How do you praise someone professionally?

Here are a few ways to respond to a compliment:

  1. “Thank you, it makes my day to hear that.”
  2. “I really put a lot of thought into this, thank you for noticing.”
  3. “Thank you, I really appreciate you taking the time to express that.”
  4. “Thank you, I am happy to hear you feel that way!”
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What should I say instead of good?

synonyms for good

  • acceptable.
  • exceptional.
  • great.
  • positive.
  • satisfactory.
  • satisfying.
  • superb.
  • valuable.

How do you say well done?

Synonyms & Antonyms of well-done

  1. faultless,
  2. finished,
  3. flawless,
  4. meticulous,
  5. perfect,
  6. perfected,
  7. polished.

What can I say instead of praise?

Instead of: ” I’m so proud of you! ” Try: “You must be so proud of yourself!”

How do you say very good to students?

Choose — and use — one of these 99+ ways to say “Very Good” to your students.

  1. You’re on the right track now!
  2. You’ve got it made.
  3. Super!
  4. That’s right!
  5. That’s good.
  6. You’re really working hard today.
  7. You are very good at that.
  8. That’s coming along nicely.

How do you say something amazing?

astonishing

  1. amazing.
  2. astounding.
  3. bewildering.
  4. breathtaking.
  5. extraordinary.
  6. impressive.
  7. marvelous.
  8. miraculous.

How do you say good work in a team?

“ You always find a way to get it done – and done well! ” “It’s really admirable how you always see projects through from conception to completion.” “Thank you for always speaking up in team meetings and providing a unique perspective.” “Your efforts at strengthening our culture have not gone unnoticed.”

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