LS Refresher 77: Each vs. Every

Cambridge Dictionary gave the following rules that will help us learn how to use “each” and “every”. We use each to refer to individual things in a group or a list of two or more things. It is often similar in meaning to every, but we use every to refer to a group or list of three or more things. 1. We […]

LS Refresher 76: Been vs. Gone

English Language Centres gave the following rules that will help us learn how to use “been to” and “gone to”  With the present perfect tense we can use both been and gone. Been- the past participle of be.  Use been to describe completed visits. If you have visited a place on holiday and then returned you have been there. Ex. She’s been to India on holiday three times. When […]

LS Refresher 75: Compare to vs. Compare with

Ginger Software and GrammarBook gave the following rules that will help us learn how to use “compare to” and “compare with”  A. Compare To- When we compare something to something else, we are placing two things—sometimes very different things—in the same category and commenting on connections we perceive. We are expressing an opinion or making an observation. Others might […]

LS Refresher 74: Bring vs. Take

Oxford Dictionaries and English Language Centres gave the following rules that will help us learn how to use “bring” and “take”  A. Bring implies movement towards someone or something. Bring is used in relation to a destination. Example: Bring your instrument with you when you come over. B. Take implies movement away from someone or something or something. We take them from the […]

LS Refresher 72: When vs. Whenever

Grammarbook.com gave the following rules that will help us learn how to use “when” and “whenever”. Rule 1 – If an event is unique or its date or time is known, use when. Example:The game will begin Friday evening when the clock strikes seven. Rule 2 – Whenever is best used for repeated events or events whose date or time is […]

LS Refresher 71: Different From vs. Different Than

Grammarbook.com gave the following rules that will help us learn how to use “different from” and “different than”  (a) Different from is a separating phrase followed by a noun or pronoun. – Alone, the adjective different is not comparative; it differentiates one thing (noun or pronoun) from another. Example:My guitar is different from your ukulele. (b) Different than is a comparative phrase usually followed by a clause. […]

LS Refresher 70: The Number vs. A Number

Grammarbook.com gave the following rules that will help us learn how to use “The Number” and “A Number” The expression the number is followed by a singular verb while the expression a number is followed by a plural verb. “A number” is always plural. “The number” is always singular. Examples: The number of people we need to hire is thirteen. A number of people have written in about this […]

LS Refresher 69: Portion Indicators

GrammarBook gave the following rules that will help us learn the proper subject-verb agreement for portion indicators.  With words that indicate portions—e.g., a lot, a majority, some, all—(A subject will come before a phrase beginning with of), and we are guided by the noun after of. If the noun after of is singular, use a singular verb. If it is plural, […]

LS Refresher 68: Talk to vs. Talk with

Grammarly Blog gave the following rules that will help us learn how to use ‘talk to’ vs ‘talk with’. Talk to and talk with both mean to converse with someone. In almost all cases, talk to and talk with can be used interchangeably. a. Talk to Some feel that talk to should be used only for one-sided conversations—when a television host addresses the viewers, perhaps, or […]