Grammar Tips (문법팁): Future Perfect Tense vs. Future Simple Tense

Do you confuse the future perfect tense with the future simple tense? Check this post and know the difference between the two.

Photo Source: Pixabay

According to Grammarly, unlike the future simple tense, we cannot use the future perfect tense without adverbials.

For example, we would not say:

  • Linda will have left.

But rather, we would say:

  • Linda will leave.

The future perfect tense must always be accompanied with adverbials that imply deadlines because it is used to talk about an action that is expected to be completed before a specified point in the future. Without specified deadlines, only the future simple tense is used.

However, in the presence of adverbials that denote the clear sequence of events, such as “before” and “by the time,” the future perfect tense and the future simple tense can be used interchangeably.

These two sentences mean the same thing:

  • Linda will leave before you get there.
  • Linda will have left before you get there.

Though if the adverbials used do not indicate the clear sequence of events, we should use the future perfect tense to show which action will be completed before some other point or action in the future.

These two sentences have different meanings:

  • At eight o’clock, Linda will leave.
  • At eight o’clock, Linda will have left.

In the first sentence, the future simple tells us that Linda will wait until 8 o’clock to leave. In the second sentence, the future perfect tells us that Linda will leave before 8 o’clock.

To know more about this topic, click here.


***DISCLAIMER: The Iamdouzone Blog doesn’t own any of the pictures, videos, articles or excerpt of the article/s featured above. Credits to the owner/s were properly stated. 

So... What have you to say?

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s