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PD Nuggets: The Right Way to Respond to Negative Feedback

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Personal development is an important factor that can help everyone achieve his or her goals. It allows us to effortlessly interact with people and easily work with them. In line with our company’s continuous desire for improvement, PD (Personal Development) Nuggets will feature topics that will help us become better individuals. Check out this article by Harvard Business Review.

 

 

 

 

1. Don’t rush to react

In my 15 years as an organizational psychologist and executive coach, I’ve seen just about every possible reaction to critical feedback. Some especially memorable responses have included punching a wall, accusing me of making their feedback up, and crying so uncontrollably that we had to reschedule the session. (Encouragingly, all three ended up making dramatic improvements once their initial emotions faded.)

All of these reactions are completely understandable. As renowned psychologist William Swann put it, when humans receive feedback that conflicts with our self-image, we “suffer the severe disorientation and psychological anarchy that occurs when [we] recognize that [our] very existence is threatened.”

 

2. Get more data

It can be disorienting to learn that people don’t always see us the way we see ourselves. I once had a coaching client named Kim, a smart, dedicated manager whose entire world had just been turned upside down by a 360 report. Even though she’d struggled with feelings of insecurity her whole career, her colleagues saw her as aggressive and arrogant in meetings. She had no idea what she was doing to create this perception. (Despite the benefits of some 360s, they can leave many questions unanswered.)

We can’t act on feedback until we truly understand it. Especially when we hear something new, it’s usually a good idea to ask a few trustworthy sources whether they’ve noticed the same behavior. Not only does this give us more detail about what we are doing to create a certain impression, it helps us avoid over correcting based on one person’s opinion. After all, as Roman philosopher Marcus Aurelius stated, “Everything we hear is an opinion, not a fact.”

-Tasha Eurich, Harvard Business Review 

To read the rest of the article, please click here. 

 

***DISCLAIMER: The Iamdouzone Blog doesn’t own any of the pictures, videos, articles or excerpt of the article/s featured above. Credits to the owner/s were properly stated. 

 

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